Tuesday, December 12, 2017

In Oct. 2017 Richard Hambleton Died at age 65, Days Before his MoMA Show and Shadowman Film Opened

Editor's note: 
Here is our retrospective of Richard Hambleton's work, we published back in 2014.

Hambleton's Art on the Berlin Wall.

Hambleton's "Marlboro Man"

Hambleton's "Shadow Man"


ART

Richard Hambleton



NYC, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, was the canvas for a street artist named Richard Hambleton. Long before "graffiti" was considered as "art", long before graffiti art stars like Banksy came on the scene and long before organized art tours were created to see the graffiti of New York City, artist Richard Hambleton painted black figures, in bold brushstrokes, on many of the walls and back alleys of Manhattan.

The artist calls his life-sized paintings “Shadow Men”. One art researcher said, "His art was originally inspired by the shadows of victims vaporized in the atomic blast at Hiroshima, Japan, implying: in the end, all that is left of us are our shadows, or what we project onto this world."

Richard's start came as a part of a famous trio of artists who worked together and regularly gathered to discuss their latest street artworks - even collaborating at times. The other two artists in this fabled group were the legendary Keith Haring and Jean Michel Basquiat. 

These works of street art are now long gone, but these three artists were the first to interest and engaged the art world in "Street Art" during the 1980s. Although Richard Hambleton has been given the unofficial title "Godfather of Street Artists", he is the "Shadow Man" of this collective. Now is the time to place Richard Hambleton's contribution and influence into the art world's bright spotlight!

Hambleton (above), Basquiat & Haring
worked closely inventing 1980's Street Art
Street Artist Jean Michel Basquiat

Street Artist Keith Haring

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Marlboro Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

 A Colaboration of Shadow Man by Hambleton & Basquiat

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man
Richard Hambleton Video  (1)


Richard Hambleton Video  (2)


Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man

Hambleton's Gallery Show at Woodward Gallery, NYC
Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Men


Hambleton - A Version of Shadow Man
Richard Hambleton's art on the Berlin Wall

Richard Hambleton's art on gallery walls. 


Richard Hambleton Video (3)





Richard Hambleton (born June, 1954) is an artist-painter currently living and working in the Lower East Side of New York City. Richard Hambleton is the surviving member of a group who, together with Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat, had great success coming out of the New York City art scene during the booming art market of the 1980s. Much of Hambleton’s work is compared to graffiti art, however, Hambleton considers his work to be “public art”.


(Sources: The Museum of the City if New York, Phillips de Pury & Company, Woodward Gallery, NYC, CNN & YouTube)




FOOD



Moist Turkey Meatballs 
in a Rich Tomato Sauce

Ingredients

1/3 LOAF of Sara Lee 45 calories Healthy Multi-Grain bread cut into cubes (8 slices of a 1 lb 4 oz loaf), crust left on.
1 cup whole milk
1 pound ground turkey 
2 large eggs
2 tbs dried chives 
5 Grinds of salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried summer savory seasoning
3 tablespoons butter 
2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 cup white wine
1 bottle (24 oz) of tomato sauce (Classico Spicy red Pepper Pasta Sauce)
1 tsp of Pickapepper sauce

Instructions
Preheat oven to 350°F. 
Combine bread pieces and whole milk in medium bowl, pressing on bread to submerge; let stand until milk is absorbed, about 10 minutes. Squeeze out most of milk from bread; discard milk. Place bread in large bowl. 
Add ground turkey, 2 eggs, 2 tbs chopped chives, 1 tbs dried basil, 5 grinds of salt, 1/2 tsp black pepper,  3 shakes of red Tabasco sauce, 2 tsp steak seasoning, 2 shakes of Southwestern Seasoning and 1 tbs dried summer savory seasoning.
Mix well with clean hands. 
Transfer meat mixture to blender and process until well blended - mixture will become a paste.
Drop large spoonfuls of the loose mixture into mounds (meatballs) into small muffin pan cups or onto a cookie sheet. 
Bake meatballs 10 minutes. Set meatballs aside.
Melt 2 tbs butter with 2 tbs olive oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, add meatballs to skillet and sauté until brown on all sides, about 1.5 minutes per side. 
On med-high heat, whisk 1/2 cup of white wine, tomato sauce, 1 teaspoon of Pickapepper sauce, and a knob of butter into the skillet - bring to boil. 
Add the meatballs into the sauce and continue boiling (stirring frequently) for 5 minutes. 

Reduce heat to medium and simmer uncovered for 15 minutes, sauce will  thicken (stirring frequently). 

Transfer meatballs to a serving bowl and sprinkle lightly with dried parsley flakes.
Serve.

Makes 24 meatballs.
(Source: Original Recipe, Atkinson Family Cookbook)


Until later,
Jack

ARTS&FOOD is an online magazine dedicated to providing artists and collectors around the world with highlights of current art exhibitions, and to encourage all readers to invest in and participate in “The Joy of Art” and Culture. All Rights Reserved. All concepts, original art, text & photography, which are not otherwise credited, are copyright 2017 © Jack A. Atkinson, under all international, intellectual property and copyright laws. All gallery events', museum exhibitions', art fairs' or art festivals' photographs were taken with permission or provided by the event or gallery. All physical artworks are the intellectual property of the individual artists and © (copyright) individual artists, fabricators, respective owners or assignees. 
(Copyright Notice for tradenames: ©ARTSnFOOD.blogspot,com,©ARTS&FOOD, ©ARTSnFOOD.com, ©ARTSandFOOD.com, ©ART&FOOD, 
©ARTandFOOD.com, ©ARTnFOOD.com)

ASPEN ART MUSEUM - Big City Art in a Tiny Town

Aspen Art Museum Photo by By BKThomson
ART 
IN THE MOUNTAINS

THE ASPEN ART MUSEUM Previously housed in a converted hydroelectric plant at 590 North Mill Street, the new Aspen Art Museum (AAM) opened its new facility to the public at 637 East Hyman Avenue on August 9, 2014. The building was designed by architect Shigeru Ban, recipient of the 2014 Pritzker Prize for Architecture. It is Ban's first US museum to be constructed. The 33,000-square-foot, four-level facility houses eight exhibition spaces: six gallery spaces, a roof top sculpture garden, and an outdoor commons. There are five main architectural features within the building's design plan: Grand Stair, Moving Glass Room Elevator, Woven Wood Screen, Wood Roof Truss and Walkable Skylights.

For a town with a population of 6871 (as of 2016) a stunning world class museum is a fabulous asset. Of course Aspen is not your average town, first of all, most of those 6871 residents don't actually live there, it is their second home. Most of the people who keep Aspen humming live outside of town in trailer parks and smaller towns down the road.

The Aspen Art Museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The museum is a member institution of the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD), which represents directors of art museums throughout the United States, Canada, and Mexico. 

Until later,
Jack

ARTS&FOOD is an online magazine dedicated to providing artists and collectors around the world with highlights of current art exhibitions, and to encourage all readers to invest in and participate in “The Joy of Art” and Culture. All Rights Reserved. All concepts, original art, text & photography, which are not otherwise credited, are copyright 2017 © Jack A. Atkinson, under all international, intellectual property and copyright laws. All gallery events', museum exhibitions', art fairs' or art festivals' photographs were taken with permission or provided by the event or gallery. All physical artworks are the intellectual property of the individual artists and © (copyright) individual artists, fabricators, respective owners or assignees. 
(Copyright Notice for tradenames: ©ARTSnFOOD.blogspot,com,©ARTS&FOOD, ©ARTSnFOOD.com, ©ARTSandFOOD.com, ©ART&FOOD, 

©ARTandFOOD.com, ©ARTnFOOD.com)

Monday, December 11, 2017

Looking back at de Kooning




ART:
"de Kooning,
a Retrospective"

Dutch American Abstract Expressionist Artist Willem de Kooning (1904-1997) 
He was a part of the group of artists who came to be known as the New York School




"In 1926 the Dutch artist Willem de Kooning entered the United States as a stowaway and eventually settled in Hoboken, New Jersey, where he supported himself as a house painter. In 1927 he moved to a studio in Manhattan and came under the influence of the artist, connoisseur, and art critic John Graham and the painter Arshile Gorky. Gorky became one of de Kooning’s closest friends. From about 1928 de Kooning began to paint still life and figure compositions reflecting the school of Paris and Mexican mural influences. By the early 1930's he was exploring abstraction."  (Encyclopedia Britanica)



"The female figure was a theme to which de Kooning returned repeatedly. He began painting women regularly in the early 1940s and did so again later in that decade and more seriously in the 1950s. Often they are depicted in an almost graffitilike style, with gigantic, vacuous eyes, massive breasts, toothy smiles and clawlike hands set against colorful layers of paint." (The NYTimes)



The MoMA exhibition de Kooning: A Retrospective, up through January 9, 2012, is devoted to the full scope of the career of Willem de Kooning (American, b. the Netherlands, 1904–1997). In the show are some of the artist’s most famous, landmark paintings—including Pink Angels (c. 1945), Excavation (1950), and the celebrated third Woman series (1950–53)—plus examples from all of his most important series, ranging from his figurative paintings of the early 1940s to the breakthrough black-and-white compositions of 1948–49, and from the urban abstractions of the mid-1950s to the artist’s return to figurations in the 1960s, and the large gestural abstractions of the following decade.



The following is a short overview of de Kooning works included in the MoMA exhibition.
Woman 1 c.1950-51


Woman II




Pink Angels c.1945
Woman to Landscape
Easter Monday c.1955-56


Excavation c.1950


Gotham News c.1955


Seated Woman c.1952


Two Women with Still Life c.1953




Catalogue of the exhibition



BOOK:
de Kooning: A Retrospective 
By John Elderfield
MoMA's Chief Curator Emeritus 
of Painting and Sculpture


(sources: MoMA Press Department & Website , Encyclopedia Britanica, the NYTimes)

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Your Body in ART. The proportions of the human body!



ART
Human bodies fit into 
rules / proportions.
as taught in art school. 
All bodies are based 
on these same 
proportions even though
there are an infinite 
number of variations 
in each of us, 
to make everyone 
unique!

(Editor's Note: This is a bit of a departure for ARTS & FOOD, but this basic information about art, and how to draw a figure, is interesting for young artists and art appreciators alike.

Enjoy!










EARS:














(Source: Various generic sources on the web.)



Until later, 
Jack

ARTS&FOOD
 is an online magazine dedicated to providing artists and collectors around the world with highlights of current art exhibitions, and to encourage all readers to invest in and participate in “The Joy of Art” and Culture. All Rights Reserved. All concepts, original art, text & photography, which are not otherwise credited, are copyright 2017 © Jack A. Atkinson, under all international, intellectual property and copyright laws. All gallery events', museum exhibitions', art fairs' or art festivals' photographs were taken with permission or provided by the event or gallery. All physical artworks are the intellectual property of the individual artists and © (copyright) individual artists, fabricators, respective owners or assignees. 

Trademark Copyright Notice: ©ARTSnFOOD.blogspot,com
©ARTS&FOOD, ©ARTSnFOOD.com, ©ARTSandFOOD.com, ©ART&FOOD, ©ARTandFOOD.com, ©ARTnFOOD.com)